SOLVED: “Cannot connect to Adobe update server.”

If you are an Apple Mac computer user, and get a notification stating: “Cannot connect to Adobe update server” it is likely because you have an older version of Adobe Reader installed.

The message looks something like this:

If you install the latest Adobe Acrobat DC, it should fix this problem. You can find the latest version on Adobe’s website here:

https://get.adobe.com/reader/



Apple MacOS – How to Enable View Scroll Bars

In recent years, software, operating systems, and web interfaces have embraced a design trend where menus and controls are hidden unless you reveal them. When you move your mouse over just the right area of the screen, some controls, icons, or menu options will appear. You’ve likely seen this on your computer.

With Apple Mac computers, if you have a laptop or iMac with a trackpad connected the vertical and horizontal scroll bars will only appear if you move your fingers on the trackpad. If you’re not quick enough. The scroll bars disappear before you can click on them.

The default setting for showing scroll bars is set as: “Automatically based on mouse or trackpad.”

This is particularly a problem if you’re in a spreadsheet. With a mouse, you can move the scroll wheel on the mouse to reveal the vertical scroll bar. However, to move left and right within the spreadsheet, you’ll need to use a trackpad to reveal the horizontal scroll bar.

To have both the vertical and horizontal scroll bars visible all the time regardless of whether you use a mouse or trackpad, go to System Preferences > General and choose “Always” as shown below.

Avast AntiVirus for Mac Configuration for Apple Mail

If you’re using Avast AntiVirus for Mac and would like to use the Apple Mail program, you may notice a security certificate error when trying to access your email provider.

Avast has a 23 page document explaining how to correct this error.  The steps involve exporting a certificate from Avast and importing it into your mail client.

Alternative Option

If you don’t care about scanning inbound emails, you can enter your email server address as an exception and Avast won’t try to scan emails from that server. See the example below. To find this screen, open Avast, choose Preferences, then select settings for the Mail Shield. Press the + button to add your mail server.

STEP 1 – Open Avast

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 STEP 2 – CHOOSE PREFERENCES

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STEP 3 – ADD YOUR EMAIL SERVER

Replace the example below with your own email host. Use POP or IMAP as needed.

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Apple iCloud Sync Problems with Contacts and Calendar

You may occasionally experience synchronization issues with Apple iCloud, specifically with contacts or calendar entries.

Most of the time, when you add a contact or calendar event on your desktop or laptop computer, it will immediately and magically show up on all your other devices. However, sometimes it may be several minutes later and it doesn’t show up.

This can be a problem if you leave your home or office, thinking the recently added contacts will now be on your mobile device, but they aren’t.

This problem goes both ways. Sometimes items added to mobile devices don’t show up on their OS X equivalent apps.

So, here’s a trick that just might work:

  • On OS X, you can exit the Calendar or Contacts apps and start them again. This can help force a synchronization with iCloud.
  • On mobile devices, closing and re-opening apps may or may not work. You may need to add a new contact or event for the synchronization to be initiated.

Push technology is supposed to ensure that data synchronization and flow is forced to happen in real-time. However, it sometimes doesn’t work, so these tips can help in such situations.

These problems, and the solutions mentioned above, can actually happen on any synchronization platform (Windows, Android, Chrome OS, Linux, etc.) so it’s not necessarily an issue isolated to Apple.

For Google devices, a check-in can be established by sending an email or checking for new messages. This will initiate communications with their cloud services.

How to Adjust Brightness on Secondary Apple Mac Display

If you have an Apple Mac computer with a second Apple display attached, you can adjust the brightness using the following keyboard key combination on an Apple keyboard:

Hold the control key while pressing the brightness up or down keys (F1 / F2)

This only works with Apple displays and may not work on all Apple computers. This is typically an issue for people with MacBook laptop computers since the common configuration is to use the built-in display and also an external Apple display.

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Here’s Why Apple Makes the Best Windows Computer

Apple computers have the ability to run Windows, Linux, and Apple operating systems. Here are some reasons why purchasing an Apple laptop or desktop computer is a good decision for Windows users.

  1. Design. Apple computers are known for their beautiful design. This makes them pleasant to interact with.
  2. Displays. Apple has always had nice computer displays and the latest computers include Retina display technology in their laptop and high-end desktop computers. With ambient light sensors and keyboard controlled brightness, you can personalize the display making it very easy on your eyes.
  3. Keyboard. The Apple wireless or wired keyboards are excellent for those working long hours on the computer. The keys have short travel, and entry errors are almost non existent. Apple keyboards feature short-travel keys, which means your fingers don’t need to push the keys down as far, and you can type faster with less effort.
  4. Multiple Operating Systems. Using a product like VMWare Fusion, you can run multiple operating systems on an Apple computer. You can have Apple, Windows, and Linux. If you’re a computer and technical support professional, you’ll likely need to support Apple and Windows computers. With virtual computing, you could have Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10 running at the same time.
  5. Portability. The newer MacBook computers are thiner and lighter than previous models. The new MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro computers are very thin and light.
  6. Security. Although Apple computers aren’t entirely impervious to viruses, they are much more secure than Windows computers.
  7. Space Savings. Apple iMac computers are slim and accommodate an aluminum wireless keyboard that takes up very little desk space.
  8. Touch Pad. For those concerned about repetitive stress injuries, the Apple touchpad is essential. It’s highly accurate, easy to use, and with multiple gestures that require a very light touch.
  9. Voice Dictation. Apple uses the same Siri voice recognition technology in their desktop/laptop operating system as with the iPhone. It’s quite accurate in a quiet environment.

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Multiple Security Vulnerabilities in Apple Mac OS X and Apple Safari

From: State of Iowa – Information Security Office

Date Issued:  May 5, 2015

Maximum Risk Rating/Severity:  High

Brief Summary: All Apple computers (prior to v10.10.3) are vulnerable to the 46 security exploits described below. Update to the latest version of Yosemite immediately.

Overview:

Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Apple MAC OS X and Apple Safari. Mac OS X is an operating system for Apple computers. Apple Safari is a web browser available for Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. These vulnerabilities can be exploited if a user visits or is redirected to a specially crafted webpage, or opens a specially crafted file, including an email attachment, using a vulnerable version of OS X.

Successful exploitation could result in an attacker gaining the same privileges as the logged on user, remote code execution within the context of the application, and bypass of security systems. Failed attacks may cause a Denial of Service condition within the targeted delivery method. Depending on the privileges associated with the user, an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. 

Affected Software:

Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.3

Apple Mac OS X Mavericks v10.9.5

Apple Mac OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5

Apple Safari v8.0.5, 7.1.5, and 6.2.5

Description:

Multiple remote code execution vulnerabilities have been discovered in Mac OS X that could allow remote code execution. These vulnerabilities can be exploited if a user visits or is redirected to a specially crafted webpage or opens a specially crafted file. Details of these vulnerabilities are as follows:

  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to privilege escalation due to an issue with checking XPC entitlements (CVE-2015-1130).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 have multiple vulnerabilities in Apache prior to versions 2.4.10 and 2.2.29 including one that may allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code (CVEs 2015-1066, 2013-5704, 2013-6438, 2014-0098, 2014-0117, 2014-0118, 2014-0226, and 2014-0231).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 ATS (Apple Type Services) are prone to multiple input validation issues in fontd which may allow a local user to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVEs 2015-1131, 2015-1132, 2015-1133, 2015-1134, and 2015-1135).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a cross-domain cookie issue which may result in cookies belonging to one origin may be sent to another origin (CVE-2015-1089).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a cross-domain HTTP request issue which may result in authentication credentials being sent to a server on another origin (CVE-2015-1091).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an input validation issue which may result in the execution of arbitrary code by visiting a maliciously crafted website (CVE-2015-1088).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a use-after-free issue in CoreAnimation which may result in the execution of arbitrary code by visiting a maliciously crafted website (CVE-2015-1136).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to multiple memory corruption issues in the processing of font files, which may result in the execution of arbitrary code by processing a maliciously crafted font file (CVE-2015-1093).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an issue with NVIDIA graphics driver’s handling of certain IOService userclient types, which may allow a local user to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-20215-1137).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an input validation issue in the hypervisor framework which may allow a local application to cause a denial of service (CVE-2015-1138).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a memory corruption issue in the handling of .sgi files which may result in the execution of arbitrary code by processing a maliciously crafted .sgi file (CVE-2015-1139).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a memory corruption issue which may allow a malicious HID (Human Interface Device) to cause arbitrary code execution (CVE-2015-1095).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a buffer overflow issue which may allow a local user to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-2015-1140).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prune to a kernel memory content disclosure issue which may allow a local user to determine kernel memory layout (CVE-2015-1096).
  • Apple Mac OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5 and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a heap buffer overflow in the IOHIDFamily’s handling of key-mapping properties which may allow a malicious application to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-2014-4404).
  • Apple Mac OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5 and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a null pointer deference issue in the IOHIDFamily’s handling of key-mapping properties which may allow a malicious application to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-2014-4405).
  • Apple Mac OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5 and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an out-of-bounds issue in the IOHIDFamily driver which may allow a use to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-2014-4380).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an issue in the handling of virtual memory operations within the kernel which may allow a local user to cause unexpected system shutdown (CVE-2015-1141).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a race condition in the kernel’s setreuid system call which may allow a local user to cause a system denial of service (CVE-2015-1099).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to setreuid and setregid system calls not dropping privileges permanently which may allow a local application to escalate privileges (CVE-2015-1117).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 ICMP redirects were enabled by default, which may allow an attacker with a privileged network position to redirect user traffic to arbitrary hosts (CVE-2015-1103).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an issue processing TCP headers which may allow an attacker with a privileged network position to cause a denial of service (CVE-2015-1102).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an out of bounds memory access issue which may allow a local user to cause unexpected system termination or read kernel memory (CVE-2015-1100).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to improper treatment of some IPv6 packets which may allow a remote user to bypass network filters (CVE-2015-1104).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a memory corruption issue in the kernel which may allow a local user to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges (CVE-2015-1101).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a state inconsistency issue in the handling of TCP out of band data which may allow a remote attacker to cause a denial of service (CVE-2015-1105).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an input validation issue in LaunchService’s handling of application localization data which may allow a local user to cause the Finder to crash (CVE-2015-1142).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a type confusion in LaunchService’s handling of localized strings which may allow a local user to execute arbitrary code with system privileges (CVE-2015-1143).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a memory corruption issue in the handling of configuration profiles which may allow the processing of a maliciously crafted configuration profile to cause unepxted application termination (CVE-2015-1118).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to weak key generation in ntpd when an authentication key is not configured which may allow a remote attacker to brute force ntpd authentication keys (CVE-2014-9298).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to multiple input validation issue in OpenLDAP which may allow a remote unauthenticated client to case a denial of service (CVEs 2015-1545 and 2015-1546).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to multiple vulnerabilities in OpenSSL 0.9.8zc, including one that may allow an attacker to intercept connections to a server that supports export-grade ciphers (CVEs 2014-3569, 2014-3570, 2014-3571, 2014-3572, 2014-8275, and 2015-0204).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 and OSX Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an Open Directory Client issue which may allow an unencrypted password to be sent over the network when using Open Directory from OS X Server (CVE-2015-1147).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to multiple vulnerabilities in PHP, including one which may lead to arbitrary code execution (CVEs 2013-6712, 2014-0207, 2014-0237, 2014-0238, 2014-2497, 2014-3478, 2014-3479, 2014-3480, 2014-3487, 2014-3538, 2014-3587, 2014-3597, 2014-3668, 2014-3669, 2014-3670, 2014-3710, 20214-3981, 2014-4049, 2014-4670, 2014-4698, and 2014-5120).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a memory corruption issue in the handling of iWork files which may allow an opened, maliciously crafted iWork file to execute arbitrary code (CVE-2015-1098).
  • Apple Mac OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5 is prone to a heap buffer overflow which may allow viewing a maliciously crafted Collada file to lead to arbitrary code execution (CVE-2014-8830).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to an issue that may allow a user’s password to be logged to a local file (CVE 2015-1148).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an issue that may allow tampered applications to launch (CVEs 2015-1145 and 2015-1146).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2 is prone to a memory corruption issue in WebKit that may result in arbitrary code execution after visiting a maliciously crafted website (CVE-2015-1069).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an issue in Safari that may allow users to be tracked by malicious websites using client certificates (CVE-2015-1129).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an issue in Safari that may allow user’s browsing history in private browsing mode to be revealed (CVE-2015-1128).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to an issue in Safari that will cause the incomplete purging of a user’s browsing history (CVE-2015-1112).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to multiple memory corruption issues in WebKit that may result in unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution after visiting a maliciously crafted website (CVEs 2015-1119, 2015-1120, 2015-1121,2015-1122, and 2015-1124).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a state management issue that may result in a user’s browsing history in private mode being indexed (CVE02015-1127).
  • Apple Mac OS X Yosemite prior to v10.10.2, OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5, and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5 are prone to a an issue in WebKit’s credential handling for FTP URLs that may result in resources of another origin being accessed after visitng a maliciously crafted website (CVE-2015-1126).
  • Security Update 2015-004 (available for OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5 and OS X Mavericks v10.9.5) also addresses an issue caused by the fix for CVE-2015-1067 in Security Update 2015-002. This issue prevented Remote Apple Events clients on any version from connecting to the Remote Apple Events server. In default configurations, Remote Apple Events is not enabled.

Successful exploitation could result in an attacker gaining the same privileges as the logged on user, remote code execution within the context of the application, and bypass of security systems. Failed attacks may cause a Denial of Service condition within the targeted delivery method. Depending on the privileges associated with the user, an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.

Solution/Recommendations:

We recommend the following actions be taken:

  • Upgrade to Apple Mac OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 immediately after appropriate testing.
  • Apply appropriate updates provided by Apple to vulnerable systems immediately after appropriate testing.
  • Run all software as a non-privileged user (one without administrative privileges) to diminish the effects of a successful attack.
  • Remind users not to download, accept, or execute files from un-trusted or unknown sources.
  • Remind users not to visit un-trusted websites or follow links provided by unknown or un-trusted sources.

Apple References:

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Cisco AnyConnect Web Security Not Compatible with Avast Apple Mac

If you attempt to install Avast Antivirus on your Apple Mac computer, you may get the following error message:

Incompatible software detected. The Web Security module of Cisco has been detected, which is not compatible with Avast. To install the Avast product, please uninstall the incompatible module first.

When you click the Close button, the installation will immediately quit.

Follow these instructions to fix this problem:

  1. If you have a direct license with Cisco, you can visit the Cisco Software Download Page and download the AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client. Navigate to the AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client v3.x download page and look for the download called Standalone DMG package for Mac OS X “Intel” platforms.
  2. For many people, you will need to go to your organization or employer software download page and download the version provided.
  3. Follow the installation instructions, and remember not to select the Web Security module (see below). This will configure the software so that Avast can be installed.

These are the installation screens. Click any image for a larger gallery view.

Apple Time Machine Backup Failure

If you’re using the Apple OS X integrated Time Machine backup software, at some point you’ll likely get an error message stating: “Backup Failed. Time Machine couldn’t back up to ‘your_drive_name'” — where your_drive_name will be the backup drive you’ve assigned.

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Thinking it must have just been a one-time glitch, you’ll manually run a backup, but that will result in an error as well.

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You’ll then check the drive only to discover that although the backup folder exists, its contents are all gone.

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You’ll panic a little, and then consider using Disk Utility to repair the disk. However, upon running Repair Disk, you’ll get a strange alert that says, “Alert. Some information was unavailable during an external lookup.”

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After some hair pulling, you’ll figure the only option is to start all over again by formatting (erasing) the drive and doing a complete backup again.

However, when you attempt to erase the drive, you’ll get an error.

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Problems with formatting a drive can be an indication that the partition is corrupted somehow. So, you’ll take things to the next level and attempt to partition the drive, but that will also result in an error.

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At this point, assuming that the drive is defective, you’ll throw it in the trash can and purchase a new one.

The Time Machine backup program will work fine with the new drive for a while, but then you’ll get the error again stating the backup failed.

You’ll start all over again at the top of this page and get to this paragraph.

Realizing that the problem is likely not repeated failed hard drives, but something very quirky with Apple OS X, you’ll search the web to see if anyone else is having trouble with Time Machine backups. You’ll discover that Apple has dedicated an entire support page to all the things that can go wrong with Time Machine. Apparently you’re not alone.

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With a mix of joy and frustration, you’ll see a link titled, “Apple Support article: Time Machine stops backing up to external disk.”

Finally your search is over.

You click the link, but it takes you to a page with an error stating, “We’re sorry. We can’t find the page you’re looking for. Please return to the Apple Support homepage.”

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Assuming it’s a browser issue, you’ll switch from using Chrome to using Safari, and try visiting the support page again. However, this time, the support page won’t even load.

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You’ll think to yourself, “Great. Apple’s website doesn’t even work with Apple’s browser.”

At this point you’ll want to write a blog article about the above experience, and switch to Linux.

You’ll switch to Linux.

You’ll pull your old backup drive out of the trash can, and out of curiosity, you’ll plug it into your Linux computer to find that it actually isn’t defective, and the files weren’t erased. Unfortunately, Apple’s file system permissions will be set so you won’t have permission to read the files. There’s probably a solution to that, but you’ll save that for another day.

Mactracker Apple Mac Specifications Guide

The Mactracker software runs on OSX and iOS platforms, and provides a helpful listing of hardware specifications as well as operating system information. Here’s a description from the developer’s website:

“Mactracker provides detailed information on every Apple Macintosh computer ever made, including items such as processor speed, memory, optical drives, graphic cards, supported OS versions, and expansion options. Also included is information on early Apple systems, Apple mice, keyboards, displays, printers, scanners, speakers, cameras, iPod, Apple TV, iPhone, iPad, Wi-Fi products, Newton, iOS, Mac OS, and OS X versions.”

The latest release, version 7.3.4, has the feature enhancements listed below. Previous versions are also listed.

Please note that this release requires OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard or later. Download version compatible with OS X 10.5.8 Leopard.

Version 7.3.4

  • Adds iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus
  • Adds iOS 8
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.3.3

  • Adds MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Mid 2014) and MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014)
  • Adds iMac (21.5-inch, Mid 2014)
  • Adds Apple Lisa and Apple Lisa 2
  • Adds 16 GB configuration to iPod touch (5th generation)
  • Adds details on latest OS X and iOS releases
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.3.2

  • Adds MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2014) and MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2014)
  • Adds details on latest iOS releases
  • Adds second Wi-Fi ID field to “My Models” for dual-band Wi‑Fi devices
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.3.1

  • Updates iPad (4th generation) and iPhone 5c with latest configurations
  • Adds details on latest OS X and iOS releases
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.3

  • Adds Apple I, Apple II, Apple II Plus, Apple III / Apple III Plus, Apple IIe / Apple IIe Enhanced, Apple IIc, Apple IIGS, Apple IIe Platinum, and Apple IIc Plus
  • Adds Apple Monitor III, Apple Monitor II, Apple Monitor IIc, Apple IIc Flat Panel Display, AppleColor Monitor 100, ColorMonitor IIe/IIc and AppleColor Composite Monitor IIe/IIc, AppleColor Composite Monitor, AppleColor RGB Monitor, Apple Monochrome Monitor, and Apple Monochrome Monitor IIe
  • Adds Apple Mouse / Apple Mouse IIc and Apple Mouse II / Apple Mouse IIe
  • Adds typical acoustical performance, where available, to MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro models
  • Fixes issue with importing system overview reports created by Apple Remote Desktop to “My Models”
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.2.3

  • Fixes an issue that could cause Mactracker to crash on OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products

Version 7.2.2

  • Adds Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • Adds the ability to import system overview reports from Apple Remote Desktop to “My Models”
  • Adds Thunderbolt and 4K display support information to recent Mac models
  • Adds typical acoustical performance, where available, to Mac mini, iMac, and Mac Pro models
  • Fixes issue with importing reports created by System Profiler to “My Models”
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.2.1

  • Adds details on latest iOS releases
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.2

  • Adds MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) and MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013)
  • Adds iMac (21.5-inch, Late 2013) and iMac (27-inch, Late 2013)
  • Adds iPad Air (Wi-Fi) and iPad Air (Wi-Fi + Cellular)
  • Adds iPad mini (2nd generation) (Wi-Fi) and iPad mini (2nd generation) (Wi-Fi + Cellular)
  • Adds iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c
  • Adds iOS 7
  • Adds OS X 10.9 Mavericks and OS X Server 3.0
  • Adds additional information on early Mac OS releases
  • Adds case color details to Classic Macintosh, Macintosh Performa, Power Macintosh, and Power Mac G3/G4/G5 models
  • Adds Maximum Battery Cycle Count information to MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air models
  • Adds Intelligent Assistant and Processor Architecture information to iPhone and iPad models
  • Adds support for OS X 10.9 Mavericks
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1.5

  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1.4

  • Adds MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2013) and MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2013)
  • Adds AirPort Extreme 802.11ac and AirPort Time Capsule 802.11ac
  • Adds iPod touch 16GB (5th generation)
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1.3

  • Adds entry to indicate if Power Nap is supported on a particular model
  • Updates name of iPad (4th generation) and iPad mini for consistency with iPhone 5
  • Updates iMac (Late 2012) and iMac (Early 2013) models with new configure-to-order options
  • Fixes an issue where benchmarks were not displayed in Compare
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1.2

  • Adds iMac (21.5-inch, Early 2013) (Education only model)
  • Includes improvements to “My Models” functionality
  • Adds system requirements to iPod, iPhone, and iPad models
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1.1

  • Updates iPod shuffle (4th generation) with 2012 color lineup
  • Adds pixel density information to Cinema and Thunderbolt display models
  • Fixes an issue that caused Mactracker to crash on launch for some users
  • Fixes an issue with exporting entries in “My Models”
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.1

  • Adds MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2013) and MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013)
  • Adds AppleDesign Powered Speakers, AppleDesign Powered Speakers II, Apple Pro Speakers, and iPod Hi-Fi
  • Updates iPad (4th generation) models with 128 GB configuration
  • Updates Apple TV (3rd generation) with component refresh details
  • Adds the ability to search by serial number for recent models
  • Adds Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) number for recent models
  • Adds information on maximum number of connected Thunderbolt displays
  • Updates functionality for providing feedback
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.0.1

  • Adds iMac (21.5-inch, Late 2012) and iMac (27-inch, Late 2012)
  • System requirements updated to OS X 10.6.8 or later
  • Other minor changes and additions

Version 7.0

  • Adds MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012)
  • Adds Mac mini (Late 2012) and Mac mini Server (Late 2012)
  • Adds iPad (4th generation) (Wi-Fi), iPad (4th generation) (Wi-Fi + Cellular) and iPad (4th generation) (Wi-Fi + Cellular Sprint + Verizon)
  • Adds iPad mini (Wi-Fi), iPad mini (Wi-Fi + Cellular) and iPad mini (Wi-Fi + Cellular Sprint + Verizon)
  • Adds iPhone 5 (GSM North America), iPhone 5 (GSM International) and iPhone 5 (CDMA)
  • Adds iPod nano (7th generation) and iPod touch (5th generation)
  • Adds iOS 6
  • Optimized for Retina displays
  • Mactracker is now built with the Cocoa framework
  • Adds marketing tagline, where available, for recent models
  • Adds separate entry for Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) information to iPad and iPhone models
  • Adds environmental requirements to iPad, iPhone and iPod models
  • Fixes an issue that could cause Mactracker to crash on OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion
  • System requirements updated to OS X 10.7 or later
  • Updates Support Status for Apple’s latest Vintage and Obsolete products
  • Other minor changes and additions

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